Adhesives: A Sticky Situation

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According to the gluehistory.com:

Did you know that Birch -bark – tar was used to bind rocks together?

Did you know that one square inch of superglue can hold one ton?

Glues and adhesives is an 11 billion dollar industry.

The first commercial glue plant was established in Holland in 1690.

The first British glue patent was granted in 1750.

The first US glue patent was granted in 1876.

Economists are forecasting that adhesive industry will reach a yearly turnover of almost $50 billion around 2020.

What’s the difference between glues and adhesives?

Glues have a natural origin.

Adhesives are synthetic.

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Have you ever made homemade paste?  I have a couple of recipes for you:

Homemade Paste 1

Materials

  • 3/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons corn syrup
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • Small saucepan
  • Small bowl
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 3/4 cup cold water

Directions

  1. Mix water, corn syrup, and vinegar in saucepan.
  2. Bring to a full, rolling boil.
  3. In bowl, mix cornstarch with cold water.
  4. Add this mixture slowly to the hot mixture, stirring constantly until the mixture returns to a boil.
  5. Boil for 1 minute, then remove from heat.
  6. When cooled, pour into another container and let stand overnight before using.

Homemade Paste 2

Materials

  • 1/2 cup flour
  • Cold water
  • Saucepan
  • Food coloring (optional)

Directions

  1. Add cold water to flour until mixture is as thick as cream.
  2. Simmer and stir in saucepan for 5 minutes.
  3. Add a few drops of food coloring, if desired.
  4. This wet, messy paste takes a while to dry.

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Growing up I used Elmer’s glue and rubber cement. Elmer’s glue was used in most home craft projects. Rubber cement was used to glue leather seams open on my leather coat that I constructed in high school home ec. class.

My children used glue sticks and scotch tape, for the most part.

Here are my three most common adhesives and examples of when I would use them…

  1. Scotch tape.
    1. Making a paper larger
    2. Put on drywall before tapping a nail in place to hang a little quilt or photo.
  2. Mistyfuse
    1. Use iron and BoNash Amazing pressing sheet to bond fabric to fabricimg_20161128_151852
  3. Bonash Fuse It Powder
    1.  Confetti quilting technique: Spritz with water and heat using an amazing pressing sheet

      Italy

      confetti quilt

All adhesives are not created equally.

Think about your project and buy the appropriate adhesive. Think about the end use and how the glue or adhesive will dry.

Will the piece be folded?

Will the piece be stitched?

Will the piece be exposed to the sun?

With pieces that will be folded, do not use heat and bond, unless you want the creased to stay. I used Heat ‘n Bond light here to make this bag.  I wanted the creases to remain.

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Do not use glues that dry hard if you are going to stitch over it. I have made many quilts for churches.  The blocks were created in a CCD class and delivered to me.  When hot glue is used, you cannot stitch through it. BEWARE!

Use ultraviolet adhesive to prevent yellowing due to sunlight. I once made my Red Barn confetti pattern and used white Mistyfuse. behind the snowman.  Over time it yellowed.  There is a fix!!!!!!!! Mistyfuse now sells a ultraviolet Mistyfuse adhesive. It does not turn yellow with time. I use it behind all my light fabrics. LOVE THIS PRODUCT.  THAT’S WHY I SELL IT ON MY WEBSITE.

Did you know there were so many glues? And adhesives?

Find the right one and stick to it.

Linda Ramrath

Inspiredlayers.com

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About inspiredlayerslinda

I have been quilting for more than 18 years. I am an Island Batik Ambassador for 2017. I enjoy the challenge of designing new quilt patterns with this very special batik fabric collection. I joined Toastmasters to find my voice and learn to share my quilts and stories with others.
This entry was posted in adhesives, batik confections, finished project, free motion quilting, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

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